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March 2010

A Carton of Soy Crayon Eggs
Art, Crafts, Easter, Holidays

Make Your Own Soy Egg Crayons for Easter

Triple love this crafty idea from Kimara over at Wee Folk Art (one of my favorite blogs for Waldorf-inspired crafts).

Make your own Soy Crayon Eggs for Easter! Similar to the soy-based Crayon Rocks sold at Bella Luna Toys, a carton of these colorful egg-sized crayons is sure to delight any child on Easter morning.

Be sure to visit www.weefolkart.com for instructions on making this delightful and colorful project.

Thank you, Kimara!

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Babies, Parenting, Photographs

Babywearing and Sling Safety

On my recent visit to Chiapas, Mexico in January, I was impressed to see the indigenous Mayan women wearing their babies. With babies strapped snuggly to their backs, I saw women selling produce and wares at the public markets, and women farming and working the land while wearing their babies. During my visit, I never saw a single stroller. I found myself wishing that more American mothers would return to this practice.

Mayan Baby Wearing in Chiapas, Mexico

So imagine my alarm when I became aware of the recent controversy over the use of baby slings. My fear was that this would turn mothers away from this age-old practice.

Fortunately, Mothering magazine promptly responded to the controversy and issued this statement:

SANTA FE, NM (March 18, 2010) — On March 12, the Consumer Product Safety Commission (CPSC), a Federal Agency, issued a warning in regard to the use of baby slings. The CPSC asserts that there is a risk of slings suffocating infants who are younger than four months old, and that caution should be used when carrying babies of this age group in slings.

Mothering puts the CPSC warning in perspective: Babywearing is safe, but some slings and positions are not. While baby carriers are as old as civilization, modern babywearing has exploded in the last four years. Along with this rapid increase in use has come the creation of some unsafe carriers, in particular bag-style slings that have a deep pouch, excessive fabric, and an elasticized edge. These deep, bag-style slings can be especially dangerous for premature or small babies.

Some general guidelines for safe babywearing:

1. Only choose a sling that allows you to see your baby’s face.

2. Be sure baby is not curled up tightly, chin to chest. This position can restrict breathing, especially in newborns or in infants who cannot yet hold up their heads.

3. Make sure that the sling fabric is “breathable,” and keep baby’s face clear of fabric.

4. Do not press baby’s face tightly against the sling wearer’s body.

5. Position the baby’s face upward.

6. Reposition baby if there are any signs of respiratory difficulty: rapid or labored breathing, grunting or sighing with every breath, restlessness.

For more information, see Mothering’s Special Report on Babywearing

For babywearing safety tips, see “Babywearing 101

So I hope that you mothers of infants and toddlers won’t panic, but will heed these precautions and continue to wear your babies in good health and with love. Your children will benefit from their closeness with you!

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Childhood, Play, Sarah's Silks, Waldorf Education, Waldorf Toys, Wooden Toys

Waldorf Education in a Nutshell

Are all Waldorf teachers asked to describe Waldorf education “in a nutshell” as often as I am? I suspect so. One of my esteemed colleagues, Nancy Foster, a veteran teacher who taught at  Acorn Hill Waldorf Kindergarten in Silver Spring, MD even wrote a book entitled In a Nutshell, answering parents questions about Waldorf education.

Even though it’s a nearly impossible task, given the muti-faceted nature of Waldorf education and the almost-too-many-to-name  aspects that differentiate a Waldorf classroom from the educational mainstream, I did my best to give a “nutshell” picture of a Waldorf early childhood program recently for the wonderful crafting blog, Wee Folk Art. Here it is, reprinted in its entirety, with thanks to Kimara for asking such great questions that were a pleasure to answer!

Interview with Sarah Baldwin of Bella Luna Toys
By Kimara – Originally posted at Wee Folk Art on 14 February 2010

Sarah Baldwin, Waldorf teacher and owner of Bella Luna Toys

Kimara: In a nutshell, what distinguishes a Waldorf classroom from a more traditional educational environment?

Sarah: There are so many facets and layers to Waldorf education that it is nearly impossible to describe it in a neat, tidy package, even though I am frequently asked to do so! Since I am an early childhood teacher, I will highlight three of the key elements that distinguish a Waldorf early childhood classroom from that of a more mainstream preschool.

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