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Sunday With Sarah LIVE

Sarah Baldwin, M.S.Ed., Waldorf teacher, author, and owner of Bella Luna Toys, answers viewers’ questions on:

  • Boys and Gun Play
  • Waldorf Education
  • Learning to Read
  • Resources for Puppet Plays
  • Parenting

and more in this one-hour Facebook Live event (recorded July 31, 2016).

Note: The Sarah’s Silks giveaway mentioned in the video has ended.

0:00    Welcome and Introduction

0:45     Be sure to Like Bella Luna Toys on Facebook. Then hover on the “Liked” button and choose “See First” to be sure not to miss my posts.

3:24     Boys and Gun Play

14:56   Is a Waldorf school appropriate for a child on the autism spectrum?

18:32   What is the difference between Waldorf education and Montessori education?

25:48   How do I respond to a four-year-old who is showing an interest in letters and reading?

31:19    How can I incorporate Waldorf elements, like “rhythm,” into my Montessori classroom?

35:05   How should I go about introducing Waldorf homeschooling to my 6-year-old and 4-year-old?

38:31   What ages does Waldorf education cover? What about homeschooling through middle school and high school?

43:34   What toys would you recommend for a 6-month old girl?

48:47   What components would you feel are essential in a 3-year-old’s home and school environment?

51:58    What resources would you recommend for puppet plays for 3- to 6-year-olds?

57:14    Thank you so much for joining me for this first live event! I’d welcome your feedback and hope you’ll join me again!

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Waldorf Storytelling Circle Time
Homeschooling, Storytelling, Waldorf Education

Storytelling: The Heart of Waldorf Education

From a Parent-Toddler class through the grades, children in a Waldorf school are immersed in stories.

Starting with simple nature stories in the early childhood, children will hear many stories through the years: fairy tales, folk tales, fables, myths, legends, biographies, and stories from history, spoken aloud by the teacher and transmitted heart-to-heart.

In addition, academic subjects throughout the grades−from math to science to history to art to handwork—are all introduced through storytelling.

For example, in a past video blog post on Waldorf watercolor painting, I demonstrated how a kindergarten teacher might introduce painting with a story about “Tippy Brush,” who dips his toes into the water for a foot bath before inviting the other colors to come and play with him.

A first-grade teacher who is introducing the four processes of basic arithmetic may tell an imaginative story about Princess Plus, Duke Division, or Emperor Equal.

Teaching math through storytelling. Used with permission of the Bright Water School.

Teaching math through storytelling. Used with permission of the Bright Water School.

Introducing subjects through stories engages children’s imaginations and strengthens their inner picturing capabilities–their ability to create a picture in their “mind’s eye,” an essential skill for creative thinking later in life. Continue Reading

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Family, Sunday With Sarah, TV and Media, Waldorf Education

I Want to Turn Off the TV, but My Spouse is Not Onboard


This week I answer a question from a viewer.

Angela S. wrote:

What do you do when your spouse isn’t on the same page when it comes to turning off the TV?

My husband is huge into video games and sci-fi movies and TV shows. He loves technology and has made a point that it’s important for children to know how to use technology because it is so prevalent in today’s society and will be for years to come. He has told me that he’s heard from a teacher that those kids [who haven’t been exposed to technology] are always behind.

Also, what would be the best thing to do when someone offers to watch our son for us? They are doing us a favor and we feel a bit rude telling them that they can’t have the tv on the whole time. Our son has also come to really love a certain TV show and will beg to watch it and get really upset [if he can’t]. He’s almost 20 months old.

I feel like it’s still possible to kick the habit, but how do I get others on the same page? And how do I keep him interested in other things? He also has no patience for being read to.

Click on the video link above to hear my response to Angela.

What is your feeling about young children and screen time? Have you pulled the plug? Thinking about it? Or do you feel that screen time in moderation is not a bad thing? Would love to hear your thoughts and questions!



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