Art, Sunday With Sarah

How to Use Modeling Beeswax: A Video Tutorial

Beeswax modeling is practiced in Waldorf education from preschool up through the grades, and has become an increasingly popular artistic activity at home among Waldorf families and homeschoolers, and has even gained widespread appeal in classrooms and homes beyond the Waldorf community.

After receiving multiple phone calls at Bella Luna Toys from customers complaining that the beeswax is “too hard” and was unusable, I realized that a video tutorial was in order!

The trick with using modeling beeswax is that it needs to be warmed up first to soften it.

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Nature, Outdoor Play, Sunday With Sarah

Building Fairy Houses with Liza Gardner Walsh

After a long summer break, I’m back with another “Sunday With Sarah” for you. I’ve missed you!

This week, I invited my friend Liza Gardner Walsh, author of The Fairy House Handbook  to join me to talk about the history of fairy houses in Maine, and I invited a couple of young friends along to demonstrate.

Building fairy houses is a wonderful outdoor activity that will deepen your child’s connection to nature and engage his or her imagination. Continue Reading

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Cooking, Homemaking, Nutrition

Cooking with Children: How to Make “Stone Soup”

Cooking with Children: How to Make “Stone Soup”

Children as young as 2- or 3-years old are capable of helping with cooking. Involving children with meal preparation teaches them real-life skills and helps them feel capable and confident.

This week on Sunday with Sarah I demonstrate how I made Stone Soup (vegetable soup) with the children in my kindergarten class.

Though I never use a recipe, here are the general instructions:

  1. Chop an apple and an onion. Peel and crush 2-4 cloves of garlic. Sauté the apples, onions and garlic in olive oil and about a tablespoon of butter.
  2. Add 2-3 bouillon cubes, or 2-3 T. of bouillon paste (I like Better Than Bouillon) to the sauteed mixture.
  3. Add 2-3 quarts of water and put a clean, washed stone in the pot, and let simmer.
  4. Have children help you chop whatever vegetables you have on hand. Veggies can include potatoes, carrots, squash, sweet potatoes, peppers, broccoli, celery, zucchini, kale, spinach, or virtually any other type of fresh vegetable.
  5. Have children help add chopped vegetables to pot.
  6. Add a cup of barley or rice that has been rinsed and soaked overnight, or pasta in fun shapes.
  7. Let simmer for an hour.
  8. Enjoy! (Makes a full pot that will feed a family, with enough for leftovers.)

Items demonstrated in this video:

Find them all under our Cooking category at Bella Luna Toys.

Click here to read the Stone Soup story.

Bon appétit!

Sarah

 

If you decide to make Stone Soup with your children, let me know how it turns out! In what other ways to you involve your child/ren in the kitchen? What cooking tasks have they helped you with? Share your thoughts, comments and questions here!

 

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